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At least Street still rules.

OAFC BBS - All Topics: Archive: At least Street still rules.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By colt45allstar on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 03:21 pm:

Easy 1-2-3 8th.

This kid is so damn good, one of the few bright spot right now.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By oaktowngreen on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 04:17 pm:

he will be our all-star rep!!!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By rocket on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 04:50 pm:

When Harden comes off the DL, I expect him to
get the call.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By chavvy03 on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 05:41 pm:

And to think this kid is 21 years old, and made it onto the team his first year out. He has a 1.80 ERA and has 30 K's in 25 innings. I think we may have found our Dennis Eck of this A's generation.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By finleyshero on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 05:59 pm:

Too bad he'll be pitching for Boston by the time he's 26, either via free agency or the dispersal draft after contraction.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By yc2578 on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 06:09 pm:

That's the spirit!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By oaktownfan on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 06:39 pm:

I think Kotsay will be the A's all star rep.

He leads the team in avg:.294, RBIs:22, runs:23, and hits:53/

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By sparky on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 07:02 pm:

Kotsay eh?

He'd be like Randy Winn that one year with the D-Rays.

I guess It'd have to be him, unless someone goes on a tear. Maybe Kielty?
It might've been Harden, except, well, you know.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By yc2578 on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 07:51 pm:

Harden would definently had made the team on his own merits if he didn't get hurt. Really the A's are an example this year as to why they need to abandon the one player per team rule.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By eyleenn on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 09:01 pm:

Kotsay will need our votes to even be considered. I wouldn't be surprised if there were NO A's rep at this year's ASG.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By colt45allstar on Thursday, May 26, 2005 - 09:31 pm:

I think there has to be one for each team, it's a mandatory rule.

It's the reason people like Ted Lilly were there last season, who lacked the numbers

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By oaktowngreen on Friday, May 27, 2005 - 04:58 am:

Its a very stupid rule!!! I really would like to see the Street on the team. If we could start getting him into more save situations...that'd be awesome!

Kotsay is great but the outfield spots will be filled with legit super-stars...Kotsay just doesnt have the #'s.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By jeffreyb on Friday, May 27, 2005 - 06:30 am:

they won't pick a rookie reliever.

yeah, eye, that's a hard and fast rule. Harden, if and only if, he comes back from the injury in enough time to demonstrate that he remains lights out. Kotsay's the choice if you're looking back to the last half of the last season.

if the picks were today?

My clown-boy, who looks smarter and more grounded every day.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By jeffreyb on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 07:09 am:

Hey, when ya draft college guys, sometimes they can write a paragraph, too!

check this out, from the espn web site:

Handling the 'pressure' of the ninth inning
By Huston Street
Special to ESPN.com
Archive

Editor's Note: This is the first piece from Oakland A's rookie Huston Street, who will be writing a regular diary for ESPN.com throughout the 2005 season. The former University of Texas standout, 21, was recently named the A's closer and was the first player from the 2004 draft to play in the major leagues.

Every kid who has dreamed of being a baseball player has stood in his front yard with a bat and said to himself, "Bottom of the ninth, Game 7 of the World Series, the bases are loaded," and then envisioned hitting a home run to win the game. My job is to shatter that dream.

There is nothing like the electricity of the ninth inning in a one-run game. The emotion and elevated heartbeats of all those present turn just another inning into a "pressure" situation. These are the reasons that closers in the major leagues garner so much attention: From John Rocker sprinting to the mound, to Trevor Hoffman walking to the mound as AC/DC's "Hells Bells" ignites 35,000 fans, to the sight of Mariano Rivera entering and knowing the game is over. Any time there is a "pressure" situation, it's going to pique the interest of the onlookers. Closers get paid for that situation. From my personal experience, however, not a single one thinks about it that way.

As many games as I closed in college and as many big situations as I had experienced, the first time I stepped on the mound as a big leaguer my heart was racing, and I was back at square one.
What is pressure? When you break it down, it's nothing more than an emotion. Emotions are a product of the brain, and therefore if you control the brain, you control its reaction to these situations. In other words, pressure is a choice. You choose to think about 35,000 people screaming or the tying run on second, or you choose to think about what pitch you want to throw, where you want to throw it, and why you want to throw the pitch.

I'm not saying that closers are impervious to such feelings of excitement. I believe those who are best at their job have learned to control these feelings for a reason. As humans, we are designed to react certain ways for our benefit. When we touch a hot plate, reflexes save us from a serious burn. When we are threatened, our heart rate picks up and adrenaline increases, energizing the body in order to function at a higher level, not to hinder performance. Our brain makes the decision whether to interpret these feelings as nervousness, or to recognize their benefit and harness the energy.

Still, it's a learning process. With each situation, you gain experience, knowledge and finally, a belief in yourself. As many games as I closed in college and as many big situations as I had experienced, the first time I stepped on the mound as a big leaguer my heart was racing, and I was back at square one. One remedy I put a lot of stock in, and have noticed that a great number of other athletes do as well, is to simply take a big, deep breath. It's just about slowing everything down, and slowing yourself down.

This was absolutely necessary during my first two months in the big leagues. Please remember, I am still a fan at heart. Stepping on the mound to see the likes of Sammy Sosa, Alex Rodriguez, or Vladimir Guerrero, I'll admit, is an awkward feeling at first.

Last year at this time, I would have loved just to have their autograph. Now I'm supposed to get them out. I refer back to the mind games. I had a choice of what to focus on. One could have been this huge, intimidating man, who I have seen hit balls 500 feet on SportsCenter with regularity. Focusing on that isn't the best option. I simplified it for myself. I told myself that the plate won't move. The mound is going to feel the same. The strike zone, with slight variations, is going to be right where it has always been. So what am I going to throw, where am I going to throw it and why? Lucky for me too, I have Jason Kendall calling my pitches, which simplifies it even more.

With zero career saves, I would humbly like to define a big-league closer. He has unwavering confidence in himself. His memory is limited to the present, and his focus has a similar aim. When everyone else is thinking about the possible outcomes, he's focused on the mitt. Both success and failure motivate. Ultimately, a closer is a symbol of trust.

Huston Street is a relief pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. He is playing in his first season in the major leagues.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By goldtymer on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 07:38 am:

Quick..Stop Street, he is never to write an article again. I am having horrible flashbacks of Carlos Pena writing about his rookie season with the A's and what happened to him. If fact is he in the minors right now?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By oaktownfan on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 08:02 am:

Street is one of the best young pitchers in the game right now. I don't know if there was ever a closer that won ROY the year but if Street continues on his impressive start for the rest of the 4 months, he's gotta be one of the leading candidates.

2-1, 1 save, 24 IP, 19 hits, 6 ERs, 5 BBs, and 24 Ks.

Street has more strikeouts than he has allowed both and walks combined.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By oaktownfan on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 08:06 am:

Correction, Street has 34 Ks.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By raiderjohn on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 08:18 am:

What pitches does he throw?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By yc2578 on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 08:19 am:

Street actually has 15 walks. That's the only thing I'd like to see him improve on. Once he reduces his walks he'll be unstoppable.

Closers who have won ROY:

Butch Metzger, San Diego 1976
Steve Howe, Los Angeles 1980
Todd Worrell, St. Louis 1986
Gregg Olson, Baltimore 1989
Scott Williamson, Cincinnati 1999
Kazuhiro Sasaki, Seattle 2000 (not really a rookie)

Right now though I'd have to consider Chris Young of the Rangers the favorite. Joe Mauer is not eligible as he's in the same boat as Lew Ford was last season. He was on the active roster one day too long last season to remain eligible.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By oaktownfan on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 08:34 am:

Yeah, Street has 17 hits and allowed 15 BBs.

Also, Street has 33 Ks!

Yeah, the BBs are a problem but he's young and he'll improve on it. The last 5 1/3 IP, he has only allowed 2 BBs.

As for the other ROY candidates. Young like many of the Rangers pitching will fade once the Texas heat comes in the summer and Mauer. Yeah, he'll probaly be the favorite but I still wouldn't consider him a true rookie even as he did play some last year, very little, but Street if he has 25+ saves and has a sub 2 ERA, he'll be hard to beat.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By bigthree17 on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 09:30 am:

Anyone else notice that his velocity was down last night? Or was there just something wrong with the FSN radar gun?

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By washfan on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 09:42 am:

Getting away from pitching performance I thought Tim Roy made a very funny off the cuff remark during the telecast when he stated that Huston would be writing an online journel for an "Eternally Self Promoting Network"...Can't we just get rid of Greenmold and have Roy & Kuiper full time?

On another note it is really nice to see a jock that is actually articulate....hope it was not a ghost writer.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By jerryo1 on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 10:55 am:

"Anyone else notice that his velocity was down last night? Or was there just something wrong with the FSN radar gun?"

I don't know if the in-house (ballpark) gun is the same as the FSN number, but I did not notice topping 90 mph on any pitch (that I checked) on the Coli gun. Hmmm.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By jeffreyb on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 05:22 pm:

Updated: June 7, 2005



Realize the opportunity
By Huston Street
Special to ESPN.com

Editor's Note: Oakland A's rookie Huston Street will be writing a regular diary for ESPN.com throughout the 2005 season. The 21-year-old former University of Texas standout was recently named the A's closer and was the first player from the 2004 draft to play in the major leagues.

Defining moments are how we recall our lifetimes. Some moments are positive; other moments are not so positive. Either way, they profoundly affect further decisions we make, and therefore the various outcomes to situations in our respective lives. Every aspiring ballplayer encounters such a moment during the early days of June in his draft year. This day is the culmination of his god-given ability and 18-21 years of commitment and sacrifice to the game, and ultimately it will give a kid some perspective to his standing in the game. It goes without saying that this day comes with great anticipation and expectation.

Nowadays it seems as if the football and basketball drafts take two weeks to finish. You've got specialists giving their "Top-10 Picks," then there are all the pre-draft shows. Finally, on the day of the draft, you again hear from all the specialists to give you more up-to-date predictions, all of this is occurring on yet another pre-draft show. Even once the draft begins there might be 5-15 minutes between picks.

The Major League Baseball Player Draft, however, operates in a totally different fashion. The draft is covered on a live Internet broadcast that's it. There are no specialists or commercial breaks to fill the void between picks. The first round is over minutes after it has begun. If your computer freezes, you could easily miss hearing your name getting called.

I can recall my draft morning with vivid detail. The majority of my Texas teammates and I were all huddled around the lone computer in our locker room. All of us who were eligible for the draft were sitting in chairs trying as hard as possible not to let on exactly how nervous we all were. A thousand thoughts were running through my brain, and mostly I just wanted it to be over. As each of our names eventually got called, we would exchange hugs and high-fives. Some people screamed in jubilation, while others sighed in disappointment. Immediately after I was drafted, I felt a surreal sense of where I was, who I was, and what had just happened. The closest thing I can compare it to, without ever experiencing it, would be the first morning you wake up married. It's something you've always wanted and expected. Yet still you ask yourself if it really has happened.

This is a day that will forever echo through the lives of those involved. I was fortunate and got taken in the slot I wanted and by a team I had a lot of interest in. The recollection of my draft is quite favorable, but this isn't always the case. Every year in the draft, some kids get drafted higher than expected, and others, consequently, slide. Oftentimes two seemingly similar situations aren't even comparable. It is hard for a player who was expecting a first-round slot to be excited about getting drafted in the third round, while a player drafted in the third round who wasn't expecting any better than a fifth-round offer has a totally different perspective. Basically one player is reluctant to sign, while the second player couldn't be more eager to ink his name.

Through all this, there is still a lot of baseball yet to be played. If I had any advice to give those entering the draft, it would be to realize the opportunity you are given. Remember that your work is never finished. Every single day you either get a little better, or a little worse; you don't stay the same. Even when you make it to the big leagues, you're starting as a rookie, like me, and realize there is so much more to learn. Like I said, realize the opportunity and take advantage of it. Time is the one thing you can never get back.

Huston Street is a relief pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. He is playing in his first season in the major leagues.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By okplayer on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 09:39 pm:

finley geezus let's not be that cynical.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By goldtymer on Thursday, June 09, 2005 - 07:02 am:

I still get a wee bit nervous when our rookies start writing articles (see Carlos Pena).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message   By jeffreyb on Tuesday, June 14, 2005 - 01:41 pm:

To remain sane, remain the same
By Huston Street
Special to ESPN.com
Archive

Editor's Note: Oakland A's rookie Huston Street is writing a regular diary for ESPN.com throughout the 2005 season. The 21-year-old former University of Texas standout was recently named the A's closer and was the first player from the 2004 draft to play in the major leagues.

Baseball is an ironic game. Its greatest attributes are sometimes what make the game unbearable.

A player on a hot streak can't wait to get to the yard, while his teammate who is looking for his swing might dread his morning wake-up call. A hard shot at the third baseman gets turned for a double play, while a bloop single wins a World Series.

For the nonfan, the game is slow and unexciting, yet the object of consequence (a baseball) gets thrown the hardest, hit the farthest and sometimes is "accidentally" thrown at an opposing player.

In a game where control and execution are deemed necessary, it seems that so often the outcome is decided by something that isn't within a player's realm of control. These ironies within the game can make us swear by it or swear on it within the same breath.

I was once asked what I enjoyed most about baseball. I quickly answered, "Every day." I can't think of a better way to spend an afternoon than chasing baseballs around a big field of bright green, perfectly cut grass. It is the feeling of a well-executed slider, and watching the ball fall just below the bat. No matter what happened yesterday or is happening today, I know tomorrow when I wake up I'll have a new opportunity to play.

Shortly after the first question, I was asked what I least enjoyed about baseball. I thought for a moment and then replied, "Every day." The grass isn't so green when you're 0-for-your-last-25. I can't explain how frustrating it is when I throw my best slider and watch it get crushed into the gap, and two runners high-five after crossing home plate. The worst part of it is that tomorrow when I wake up I will have to do it all over again.

How can the same response answer and give meaning to two exactly opposite questions?

This game is simply about timing and perspective. A home run in the first inning that provides the go-ahead runs doesn't display the heroics of a ninth-inning blast that delivers the same outcome. Similarly, a booted ball followed by a double play doesn't draw even close to the condemnation of a booted ball followed by a homer.

During my short two months in the majors, I've been told numerous times (and been forced to realize myself) that the only way to remain sane is to remain the same.

Ups and downs will happen. A hard-hit ball needs to be thought of as a hard-hit ball regardless of the outcome. Sometimes you just have to tip your cap because big-league hitters hit big-league pitches.

Umpires aren't trying to screw up the call. Baseball will continue to anoint kings and destroy their kingdoms within the same series. Sometimes it is hard to view those involved with the game as human, but ask any one of them, and they will reassure you that they are.

The one game that truly illustrates the ironies found in baseball is golf. It's a roller coaster of emotion. When contained, you shoot under par with three bogies. At other times, you find yourself wild and in the middle of an 18th hole "Tin Cup" moment. Both will make you scream.

In golf, a two-foot putt counts just as much as a 350-yard drive. I guess it only seems natural that baseball players would have such a strong affection for golf.

Huston Street is a relief pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. He is playing in his first season in the major leagues.


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